Business Owner Year End Tax Planning

Business Owner Year End Tax Planning

Business Owner Year End Tax Planning

A common comment we hear from business owners who contact Sunbelt Texas about selling a business is “I didn’t know a year (or 2 or 3) ago I would be selling my business so soon.”

Before you file your taxes, keep in mind that a buyer and the buyer’s lenders will look very closely at the financials of a business for 3 full years. That means that if you sell your business in 2020 or sooner, the Tax Return you’re about to file could have a significant impact on the value of your business.

Do your business tax returns clearly and accurately reflect the earnings of the business?

Tax Planning for a Future Sale

Here are 4 areas that we often see need significant improvements to obtain the highest value in the sale of a business. Talk to your CPA about how you can move ahead to increase the value of your business.


  • Do you have an accurate inventory count and value booked into your financials?
  • Is all of your inventory in “good and saleable” condition?
  • Do you actually know what your inventory value is?
  • Have you written off the old and obsolete inventory?

Accounts Receivables

  • Are all your receivables good and collectible?
  • Have you written off the A/R you know your odds of collecting are remote?
  • Do you have customer deposits intermingled with the accounts receivables?
  • Do your receivables reflect what is actually owed to you by the customer? (We see companies that when they get a customer deposit for a job, they book the whole job as a sale and book the deposit as a partial payment even though they haven’t actually earned the sale yet)


  • Are your employees classified correctly 1099 vs W-2? Are your 1099 contractors really employees who should be classified as W-2 employees. (This is a very big issue and the government has an active program to crackdown on this….and the penalties can be severe).
  • If your 1099’s are really 1099’s, do they have an entity (i.e., LLC, S Corp, etc) you pay?
  • Do you have a properly written and valid independent contractor agreement with them?
  • Are your W-2 employees correctly categorized as hourly vs salaried and paid accordingly? You don’t want to lose a claim where, after years the employee claims you owe them thousands of hours of back overtime pay.

Owner Benefits and Compensation –
This is VERY important and can dramatically affect the value of your business:

  • Are the compensation and benefits received by the owners easily identified and properly booked on the financial statements and tax returns?
  • Do you have significant expenses that are not directly related to the business, expensed through the business that are buried in the company expenses?
    • Travel?
    • Entertainment?
    • Expenses run thru company credit cards?
    • Personal vehicles?

Tax Planning Action Item:

If your objective is to sell your business one day then you should get your financials in condition for easy due diligence and maximum value. “Burying” personal expenses in the business financials will reduce the business earnings and reduce the value to a buyer.

Our advice is for business owners to take any compensations as salary, bonuses and draws. Running non-business expenses through the business financials creates problems for proving the earnings in due diligence and raises the risks associated with potential tax liabilities


The most important element of business value is clarity of the business earnings and reduction of the risks associated with all aspects of the business. A buyer will only pay for the earnings that can be proven and the risks a buyer sees drives the multiple buyers will pay for a business.

A business with the lowest perceived risks will command the highest price multiples when being sold.

Small Business Accounting Cash vs Accrual Made Easy

Small business accounting

Cash Flow Made Easy

Small business accounting – Cash vs Accrual – Does it matter? Yes it Does.

It is not uncommon for us to receive financial information from business owners where for instance the tax returns are done on a cash basis and the financials are done on accrual basis. Often they are technically both correct but just looking at the numbers you’d think they were 2 different businesses.

Accrual accounting, done coreectly, usually presents a more accurate picture of the business. Accrual accounting simply attempts to match the revenue to the expenses when they are incurred or earned. Cash accounting simply accounts for the revenue or expenses when you recieve the cash or pay the bills.

In reality, cash accounting is almost never pure nor is accrual accounting.

Some (many) small business owners don’t understand the difference nor the effect on their financials. One way to sort out the difference is really easy. In QuickBooks and most other small business accounting packages there is a check box for reports. You can decide if you want accrual or cash. I suggest you run both on the same day and look at the differences. You might be surprised at what you learn.


Drop me a note below if you want me to take a shot at any other small business accounting or financing issues.

Also, look at Expense to profit Cash Conversion Process for more info on working capital and cash management.

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